October 5, 2017

U.S. Latinos Suffer High Hunger, Poverty Rates

Washington, D.C. – Analysis released by Bread for the World today shows that Latinos living in the United States have much higher rates of hunger and poverty than the general population.

In 2016, 18.5 percent of Latino households struggled to put food on the table compared to 12.3 percent of households nationwide. More than 19 percent of Latinos lived below the poverty line compared to the overall poverty rate of 12.7 percent.

“Latinos make significant contributions to our country. Yet, despite their hard work, there are millions of families who are unable to make ends meet,” said Bishop Jose Garcia, senior advisor at Bread for the World. “Latinos have played a key role in strengthening the U.S. economy. With a stronger economy, our nation can better invest in programs that reduce hunger and poverty.”

According to the latest U.S. Census data, 1 in 5 Latino households struggles to put food on the table–almost double the rate for white households. Latino children are nearly twice as likely to have no access to nutritious food as white children. In addition, 30 percent of households headed by an undocumented Latino, and almost 35 percent of female-headed Latino households, live below the poverty line.

Despite slowly declining poverty rates, Latino families are still more likely to struggle. Studies indicate that Latinos are paid lower wages and have higher rates of unemployment.

“Latinos have done their part,” Garcia said. “Now, our leaders should do theirs by making key investments in safety net programs—not cuts. Budget cuts being discussed in Congress weaken Latino communities and hurts our nation’s ability to end hunger.”

Tools
from our Resource Library

For Education

For Faith

  • The Bible on Health as a Hunger Issue

    A brief examination of the biblical approach to health as a hunger issue.

    Includes an introduction to the issue, a Scriptural reflection, practical actions you can take, and a prayer.

  • Sermon by David Beckmann at Duke University Chapel

    Remarks delivered October 1, 2017 at Duke University Chapel in Chapel Hill in North Carolina.

    Thank you for inviting me to preach here at Duke University Chapel. And I especially want to thank the Bread for the World members who have come this morning.

    Bruce Puckett urged...

  • Bread Newsletter January 2016

    In this issue: Another Great Year for Bread; Catholics Begin Observance of Holy Year of Mercy; Serving on ‘God’s Wave Length’ for 39 Years; and more.
     

For Advocacy

  • Grassroots Advocacy Toolkit

    A set of how-to sheets for carrying out advocacy and fact sheets on the current issues Bread for the World is working on.

    For new and current Bread grassroots hunger activists.

    Ideal as a starter toolkit for new Bread activists or as a set of updates for current activists.

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  • Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act of 2017

    Unnecessarily long prison sentences, combined with the lack of rehabilitative programs for people in prison, exacerbate hunger, poverty, and existing inequalities.

    Overly harsh mandatory minimum prison sentences have contributed to the rapid increase of our country’s prison population. The...

  • Health Care Is a Hunger Issue

    Learn more about the principles that Bread for the World supports regarding health reform.