Bread for the World Sunday

Bread for the World Sunday is an opportunity for your church or community of faith to join with others—in thousands of churches across the country—to live out God's vision of a world without hunger. Through our prayers for an end to hunger, letters, and phone calls to our nation's leaders, and financial support to Bread of the World, your church can give bold witness to God's justice and mercy in the world.

This year, Bread for the World Sunday will take place as the midterm elections approach. The outcome of those elections could have huge implications for people struggling with hunger and poverty all over the world. This is a moment when we can come together to pray for those who struggle with hunger—and rededicate ourselves to advocate for legislation that will help achieve the international goal of ending hunger by 2030.

In the Gospel of Mark, Jesus tells his disciples that, “with God all things are possible.” (Mark 10: 27). In this spirit of God-given possibility, we invite your prayers and your actions for an end to hunger.

Bread for the World Sunday is an opportunity for your church or community of faith to join with others to live out Gods vision of a world without hunger. Photo: Shutterstock

How Your Church Can Celebrate

  1. Select a Sunday or weekend when you will celebrate. Bread for the World Sunday is scheduled for Oct. 21, but you are welcome to participate on another date if that works better for your church.
  2. Plan which elements in your worship service will address hunger. Your celebration can be as simple as including prayers for people struggling with hunger during a worship service. Prayers for the day are an ideal opportunity to remember those who are hungry—and our nation’s decision makers who can change the policies and conditions that allow hunger to persist. Or you may wish to devote your sermon, children's message, and other activities to ending hunger in God's world. Many churches have a “mission moment” before the offering or perhaps there can be a special announcement.
  3. Make sure you have the resources you’ll need. Free resources in English and Spanish are available—including bulletin inserts and a Bread for the World Sunday poster. A variety of Biblical reflections and responsive prayers are available for download.Order free resources     Give Us Your Feedback
  4. As part of your Bread for the World Sunday celebration, you may want to conduct an Offering of Letters—taking time to write brief letters to members of Congress, urging them to continue our nation’s investments in programs that provide hope and opportunity for people living with hunger. A variety of resources are available to help your church conduct an Offering of Letters.
  5. Gather a special offering or collection. You may wish to allocate the funds to a denominational hunger program, a local feeding program, or Bread for the World. You may order free offering or pew envelopes for this purpose.


Use Our Bread for the World Sunday Resources

  • Bread for the World Sunday Resource Guide
    This two-page guide includes: a Biblical reflection on Mark 10:35-45 (the Gospel appointed for October 21) by Rev. Amy Reumann, director of advocacy for the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) and a responsive prayer by Father John Crossin, OSFS, Ph.D., director of spiritual formation at the Saint Luke Institute.
  • Bread for the World Sunday Bulletin Insert
    Promote your event and join people of faith across the country in praying for those who struggle with hunger.
  • Bread for the World Sunday Poster
    Advertise your worship celebration event information.


More Resources


Moved by God's Love to Create a Better Future

The strength of Bread for the World is found in our shared commitment to address the root cause of hunger: poverty, discrimination based on race and gender, unemployment, immigration, mass incarceration, and economic inequality. On Bread for the World Sunday, we recognize and give thanks for the work churches, community groups, and denominations are all doing to remove the obstacles that keep people from sharing in God's abundance. We celebrate the diversity of faith traditions across race, ethnicity, and culture that are working together to end hunger. Moved by God's love in Jesus Christ, we reach out in love to our neighbors—and we help create a better future for all.


Contact Us

If you have any questions or need support, please contact us at publications@bread.org or call 800-822-7323. Help us improve the Bread for the World Sunday experience by providing your feedback.

Give Us Your Feedback

"For the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve ..."

Mark 10:45

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