Mike Goorhouse is President/CEO, Community Foundation of the Holland/Zeeland Area.

Mike Goorhouse

Holland, Mich.
President/CEO, Community Foundation of the Holland/Zeeland Area.

Recipient of the Catalyst Award by Emerging Practitioners in Philanthropy. Previously served as a member of the youth advisory council, development committee, 60th anniversary task force, and as vice president for donor development at the Community Foundation. Named one of the top 30 civic leaders under 30 in the nation by Splashlife and the National Conference on Citizenship. Former board member for Project Clarity, Learning to Give, Kids Food Basket, Association for a More Just Society, and the Fellowship Reformed Church. Reformed Church in America.

Tools
from our Resource Library

For Education

For Faith

  • The Bible on Health as a Hunger Issue

    A brief examination of the biblical approach to health as a hunger issue.

    Includes an introduction to the issue, a Scriptural reflection, practical actions you can take, and a prayer.

  • Sermon by David Beckmann at Duke University Chapel

    Remarks delivered October 1, 2017 at Duke University Chapel in Chapel Hill in North Carolina.

    Thank you for inviting me to preach here at Duke University Chapel. And I especially want to thank the Bread for the World members who have come this morning.

    Bruce Puckett urged...

  • Bread Newsletter January 2016

    In this issue: Another Great Year for Bread; Catholics Begin Observance of Holy Year of Mercy; Serving on ‘God’s Wave Length’ for 39 Years; and more.
     

For Advocacy

  • Grassroots Advocacy Toolkit

    A set of how-to sheets for carrying out advocacy and fact sheets on the current issues Bread for the World is working on.

    For new and current Bread grassroots hunger activists.

    Ideal as a starter toolkit for new Bread activists or as a set of updates for current activists.

    ...

  • Health Care Is a Hunger Issue

    Learn more about the principles that Bread for the World supports regarding health reform.

  • Hunger by the Numbers

    In 2016, 41.2 million people were food-insecure (most recent figures available) — meaning that they were unsure how they would provide for their next meal.